Pin it to Win it: 4 Pinterest Tips for Small Businesses

It’s no secret that companies have plenty of reasons to be interested in Pinterest (or Pinterested, if you will).

As we’ve discussed in the past, Pinterest’s promoted pins and rich pins are great ways for companies to actively market themselves on the platform. Additionally, as mentioned in a previous post, Pinterest is highly influential in purchase decisions. To restate, 93% of users “plan purchases based upon the pins that they view” (source). We’d be lying if we said scrolling through feeds of latte art hasn’t, on occasion, inspired us to invest in some caffeine.

But while it might be easy to understand how Pinterest would help companies selling goods that easily appeal to consumers–fashion items, home goods, phone cases–it’s more of a stretch to see how it would help small businesses selling services or other non-physical products. Simply put, an e-book app or web design business does not immediately sound as “Pinteresty” as fairy lights.

So does that mean small businesses not offering physical goods should completely disregard Pinterest as part of their social media strategy? As a matter of fact, we don’t believe that to be the case. That’s why, without further ado, we’d like to offer 4 tips small businesses with non-physical products can use for their Pinterest strategy.

1. Share Industry Tips

Are you a web design business? An ad agency? An SEO service? Whatever industry you happen to be in, there is an audience for that industry that wants questions answered. Infographics are a great way to answer those questions while providing fun, interesting graphics on a visually-oriented app.

Screen Shot 2016-09-02 at 3.12.32 PM.png

Pin the infographics on a board, and share it among your other social media platforms. The idea is to show expertise, and compel those who may need that expertise to look further into your business.

2. Quotes/Video

Another great way to visualize what your company does and what it has done for your customers is by pinning quotes. Customer testimonials can be designed as attractive, Pinterest-sized quotation posts, or of course there is the option to repin inspirational quotes that suit your company’s branding and message. The fashion brand Reformation, for instance, created a board on Pinterest called “Word” which consists of quotes that inspire, entertain, and–most importantly–carry the essence of the Reformation brand.

Building on that, you could also pin video testimonials from your customers. You can pin a video to your Pinterest account either through the website or through the mobile app. Find the step-by-step instructions on how to do that here.

3. Portfolio work

Already have a portfolio of your work? Great, then that means you’ve got visuals to work with. Create a separate board on your Pinterest account of your portfolio work, or multiple boards for the different genres of your work. You can then edit the pins to link back to your portfolio site or pages offering each specific service.

Screen Shot 2016-09-02 at 3.15.15 PM.png

4. Brand-related Images

 Although it may not be directly promotional, repinning posts that support your brand message helps populate your boards–Pinterest recommends a minimum of 20-30 pins on a board for most weight–and can help get the original pinners of the post looking at your own posts.

That said, the more posts you pin, the more eyes end up on your posts, and the more people repin those posts. Repins happen to be more important than actual follows on Pinterest. People pin your posts in order to save them, and once they do that, the pins end up part of those people’s accounts where it can be seen by their followers. Overuse of the word “pin” aside, the short story is that through repins, your posts can be seen by exponentially growing audiences.

 

Have you tried Pinterest for your business? Why or why not? Are there any other tips you could offer? Leave your answer in the comments.

 

Comments